Robotics, Computer Vision, and Graphics

Robotics, Computer Vision, and Graphics at UMass Amherst represent the interface between computers and the world in which we live. To interact naturally with computers, we must have computers that can relate to their environment through visual and physical interactions, from recognizing the face of an approaching person to learning about dynamics by bouncing a ball. In robotics, our expertise ranges from sophisticated grasping techniques and novel motion planning methods to complex tool use and experimenting with new types of dynamically stable robots. In computer vision, our strengths include scene modeling, face identification, object recognition, and reading the text of signs in complex outdoor environments. Our graphics group focuses on high-speed realistic rendering techniques, intelligent 3D content creation techniques, processing 3D geometric data, and visualizing complex lighting effects. A major cross-cutting interest is the desire to model basic learning processes in humans and machines using data acquired from sensors mounted on robots and mobile video cameras. By adapting our computers' strategies of grasping, reaching, moving, and recognizing to real world data rather than to synthetic laboratory data, we are building systems robust enough to operate in realistic scenarios.