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Symposium on Computing for the Common Good

The Symposium on Computing for the Common Good will feature keynotes, research talks, and interactive discussions on applying computing and data science to address society’s big problems. Join your tech colleagues from higher education, industry, nonprofits, and government to learn about the ways UMass researchers are applying artificial intelligence, machine learning, and computing at scale to serve the common good, now and in the future.

This event is co-presented by the UMass Amherst College of Information and Computer Sciences (CICS) and the UMass Amherst Center for Data Science. 

Symposium on Computing for the Common Good 
March 16 and 17, 2021 | 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. EST
Virtual via Zoom 

Register


Agenda

(all times are US Eastern Standard Time)

Tuesday, March 16

12:00 - 1:15 p.m.
Welcoming Remarks: Laura Haas, Dean, UMass Amherst CICS
Keynote: Jay Ash, President and CEO, Massachusetts Competitive Partnership

1:15 - 1:30 p.m. Break

1:30 - 3:15 p.m. Featured Research Talks

3:15 - 3:30 p.m. Break

3:30 - 5:00 p.m. Live panel discussion: "Should AI Be Government Regulated? Why or Why Not?" 

wednesday, March 17

12:00 - 1:15 p.m.
Keynote: Francine Berman, Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; and Faculty Associate, Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, Harvard University

1:15 - 1:30 p.m. Break

1:30 - 3:30 p..m. Featured Research Talks

3:30 - 3:45 p.m. Break

3:45 - 5:00 p.m. 
Keynote: Jim Kurose, Distinguished Professor, UMass Amherst CICS


Keynote Speakers
 

Francine Berman is the Hamilton Distinguished Professor at RPI, Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, and former Director of the San Diego Supercomputer.  She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Council on the Humanities, co-founder of the Research Data Alliance, and a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. 

Berman is a data scientist and public interest technologist whose work focuses on the societal implications of technology.  She received the inaugural 2009 ACM/IEEE-CS Ken Kennedy Award for “influential leadership in the design, development, and deployment of national-scale cyberinfrastructure,” and the 2020 Paul Evan Peters Award, jointly sponsored by EDUCAUSE, the Coalition for Networked Information, and the Association of Research Libraries, recognizing “notable, lasting achievement in the creation and innovative use of network-based information resources and services that advance scholarship and productivity.”   

 

James KuroseJim Kurose is a Distinguished University Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he has been on the faculty since receiving his PhD in computer science from Columbia University. He received a BA in physics from Wesleyan University. He has held a number of visiting scientist positions in the US and abroad, including the Sorbonne University, the University of Paris, INRIA, Technicolor, and IBM Research. He has served in a number of administrative positions at UMass, including Chair of Computer Science, Dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and (currently) Associate Chancellor for Partnerships and Innovation. His research interests include computer network architecture and protocols, network measurement, sensor networks, and multimedia communication. He is proud to have mentored and taught an amazing group of students, and to have received a number of awards for his research, teaching and service, including the IEEE Infocom Award, the ACM SIGCOMM Lifetime Achievement Award, the ACM Sigcomm Test of Time Award, and the IEEE Computer Society Taylor Booth Education Medal. With Keith Ross, he is the co-author of the best-selling textbook, Computer Networking: a Top Down Approach (Pearson), now in its 8th edition. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the ACM and the IEEE.

Questions? Email us at symposium [at] cs.umass.edu.