Knowledge Representation And Reasoning With Deep Neural Networks

22 Feb
Wednesday, 02/22/2017 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Lederle Graduate Research Center, Room A311
Ph.D. Dissertation Proposal Defense

"Knowledge Representation And Reasoning With Deep Neural Networks"

Knowledge representation and reasoning is one of the central challenges of artificial intelligence, and has important implications in many fields including natural language understanding and robotics. Representing knowledge with symbols, and reasoning via search and logic has been the dominant paradigm for many decades. In this work, we use deep neural networks to learn to both represent symbols and perform reasoning end-to-end from data. By learning powerful non-linear models, our approach generalizes to massive amounts of knowledge and works well with messy real-world data using minimal human effort. First, we show that recurrent neural networks with an attention mechanism achieve state-of-the-art reasoning on a large structured knowledge graph. Next, we develop Neural Programmer, a neural network augmented with discrete operations that can be learned to induce latent programs with backpropagation. We apply Neural Programmer to induce short programs on a natural language question answering dataset that requires reasoning on semi-structured Wikipedia tables. We present what is to our awareness the first weakly supervised, end-to-end neural network model to induce such programs on a real-world dataset. Unlike previous learning approaches to program induction, the model does not require domain-specific grammars, rules, or annotations. 

Advisor: Andrew McCallum