On the Analysis and Management of Cache Networks

20 Sep
Tuesday, 09/20/2011 5:00am to 7:00am
Ph.D. Dissertation Proposal Defense

Elisha Rosensweig

Computer Science Building, Room 151

Over the past few years, a number of researchers have begun rethinking the fundamental communication model underlying the Internet. In addition to the traditional host-to-host communication model that has endured for more than four decades,  many researchers  have begun to focus on Content Networking - a networking model in which content is addressable and host-to-content (rather than host-to-host) interaction is the norm. With content accessibility in the spotlight, caches are poised to become central components of any Content Networking architecture. While many traditional systems employ caching as a means to improve performance, the design, analysis and management of widely deployed, tightly-connected, heterogeneous Internet-scale networks of caches, termed here Cache Networks, is a relatively uncharted field.

In this thesis we will develop modeling techniques for analyzing tightly-interconnected cache networks, and design efficient policies for locating cached content. The first part of our work addresses the modeling and analysis challenge, where we consider the behavior of these systems from a theoretical standpoint. The second part of our work considers the challenge of managing these systems, both in finding content and load balancing content requests.

Advisor: James F. Kurose